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World War Two

It is tempting to link both 20th century world wars together into a common historical thread. Perhaps this is true from a European perspective, but the United States approached each war in an entirely different way. Many Americans protested against the nation’s involvement in the First World War. They questioned why the country supported the …

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World War One

When the First World War broke out in August of 1914, most Americans were reluctant to get involved in a European conflict. American President Woodrow Wilson issued a Declaration of American Neutrality and set his sights on becoming the peacemaker between the warring nations. Although the United States, given its heritage, had a natural affinity …

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The West

The official Census Bureau definition of the west includes more than half the United States: the entire region west of the Mississippi River (including Hawaii and Alaska). When Americans refer to “the west,” however, they usually refer to the desert and mountain areas of the western United States that were in the past associated with …

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America Makes Trouble

The Boston Tea Party proved to be the spark that lit the flame of American independence from Great Britain. The cities of New York and Philadelphia had in fact successfully turned back British ships carrying taxable tea. Somehow, a ship carrying tea landed in Boston. The citizens were outraged. A complicated series of events ensued. …

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A Lasting American Tragedy

Historians still debate the cultural and economic causes of the sectional conflict that led to the Civil War, but without the slavery issue, it is unlikely to have occurred in the first place. The Emancipation Proclamation of 1863 and the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution of 1865, officially banned the practice of slavery, but these …

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The Center of America

Between the Appalachian Mountains in the east and the Rocky Mountains in the west, the center of America stretches across 1,500 miles of varying terrain. The Mississippi River Valley runs north to south through the center of this region, fed by the Ohio River from the east and the Missouri River from the west, among …

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Texas: The Lone Star State

In the national consciousness, Texas is usually thought of as a region in itself. The area of eastern Texas that borders the southern states of Louisiana and Arkansas, known for its pine woodlands, is a continuation of the Deep South. Southerners often consider Texas part of the South, especially considering the fact that the state …

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Struggle and Assimilation

The history of each ethnic and national group in the United States is at least slightly different. The story of the Italians gives a good example of a group’s struggle for acceptance into American life. All the national groups that came to the United States in the great wave of immigration from eastern and southern …

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Spanish Language In America

Significant portions of the American populace, at least 11.5%, speak Spanish as their primary language. The proportion is growing steadily. The Spanish these people speak is not just a single language or dialect, but a reflection of the entire Spanish-speaking world. Among Spanish speakers, the language spoken by Chicanos of Mexican background in Texas differs …

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The Southwest

The SouthwestThe “Southwest” is a term that usually refers to the two large desert states of New Mexico and Arizona. These states have a high native American population and have the largest Indian reservations in the country. The southwest is home to Phoenix in Arizona, at more than a million people the nation’s fifth largest …

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